Guided Mindful

Deep Breathing

Screen Shot 2018-10-31 at 2.57.13 PM.png
 

 

5 Insights to Make

a Meditation

Practice “Stick”

1) Practice when you first wake up.

It’s easiest to practice before our “day” (with it’s to-do lists, worries, and expectations, etc.) begins. So I encourage students to wake up, maybe splash some water on their face, and practice along with the offered guided meditation. Notice how it feels to begin the day by meditating.

2) Practice at the same time in the same place.

Our brain is built to notice and respond to patterning. If you sit in the same place at the same time each day and do the same “activity” (in this case, meditating) just entering the room, your body will begin to let go of stress.

3) Practice for short periods throughout the day.

Learning mindfulness is neither a marathon, nor a sprint. We don’t have to practice for long periods of time begin to experience the benefits, and we don’t have to “rush” to experience its positive effects.

4) Be gentle, be kind.

Meditation is not a self-improvement practice. It is not some new way to measure your worth or ability. It is a skill for becoming more present in and connected with life. Truthfully, you can’t really meditate “wrong”. So invite yourself to enjoy practicing.

5) Allow yourself to be a beginner.

Learning any new skill is difficult. This can be especially true for the practice of meditation. Still, the change that is possible even within a few breaths is quite remarkable. Let yourself be without expectation. As my good friend and fellow meditation teacher Kristin Page always reminds me “It’s meditation practice, not meditation perfect.”



Bringing

Mindfulness

to Work

1) Practice when you wake up.

It’s easiest to practice before our “day” (with it’s to-do lists, worries, and expectations, etc.) begins. So I encourage students to wake up, maybe splash some water on their face, and practice along with the offered guided meditation. Notice how it feels to begin the day by meditating.

2) Practice for short periods throughout the day.

Learning mindfulness is neither a marathon, nor a sprint. We don’t have to practice for long periods of time begin to experience the benefits, and we don’t have to “rush” to experience its positive effects. Whether you practice 4 times for 5 minutes or 10 times for 2 minutes, either way you are carving out time for relaxation, space, and healthy rest.

3) Do not pick up your phone before eating.

The world happens so quickly. When we wake up and immediately check our phones, our body literally transitions from a place of deep rest to stress in seconds. It’s like throwing a bucket of cold water on your nervous system! Take time to eat, tend to yourself, meditate, and then check your phone.

4) Waiting? Oh great, meditate.

One of the most common difficulties I hear from students is that they don’t have time to meditate. However, what I would like to offer is: let inconvenience be an opportunity. Stuck at a red light? Wonderful, breathe. Web page won’t load quickly? Wonderful, breathe. Waiting for your water to boil for tea. Wonderful, bre… You get the point.

5) Stressed? Oh great, meditate.

To clarify: if we only try to meditate when we feel stressed, it will  not work. I promise. However, if you are meditating regularly, when you begin to notice stress/tension in just that moment pause, breathe, and see if just this simple action shifts your experience.

6) Make self-care part of your daily ritual. 

Our brain (and thus our nervous system) thrive on habit. Practicing mindfulness meditation, you can train your brain and nervous system to respond to stress rather than react to it.